Juvenile BAER’S POCHARD?

On 26-27 July I visited the BAER’S POCHARD breeding site in Hebei Province with visiting British birders, Mike Hoit and Andrew Whitehouse, plus Beijing-based Paul Holt and Jennifer Leung.  Mike and Andrew had just arrived in China ahead of a trip to Qinghai and, with a couple of days spare, were keen to see BAER’S POCHARD.  I had warned them in advance that they are difficult to see in July – the birds are much more secretive once they begin breeding and, in summer, the vegetation is higher.  Nevertheless, I was also keen to visit the site to see whether we could find proof of breeding.  In addition to the BAER’s, the lake offers superb general birding and is probably the best place in the world to see SCHRENCK’S BITTERN, another difficult world bird.  Late July is actually a good time to see the latter, usually secretive, species as the parents make constant flights to collect food for their young.

After the long drive in 35 degrees Celsius heat, we headed straight for the most reliable spot – a series of lotus ponds with areas of open water that, from my previous visits, appear to be a favourite ‘loafing’ location for both BAER’S POCHARD and FERRUGINOUS DUCK.

We were in luck.  Almost immediately a stunning male SCHRENCK’S BITTERN made a fly-by at eye level in the lovely late afternoon light and, on one of the lotus pools, was a female BAER’S POCHARD.  Result!

Male SCHRENCK'S BITTERN.  The Baer's Pochard breeding site in Hebei must be the most reliable place to see this difficult-to-see world bird. This photo from July 2012.

Male SCHRENCK’S BITTERN. The Baer’s Pochard breeding site in Hebei must be the most reliable place to see this difficult-to-see world bird. This photo from July 2012.

Female BAER'S POCHARD, Hebei Province, 27 July 2014

Female BAER’S POCHARD, Hebei Province, 27 July 2014

Female BAER'S POCHARD stretching her wings.

Female BAER’S POCHARD stretching her wings.

After checking out different sites around the lake and enjoying good views of 2 male BAER’S on the open water, we returned to the original spot and, this time, a different BAER’S POCHARD was present.  With pale tips to the scapulars and spiky tail feathers, we believed it was a juvenile.  I took some video – see below.  Clearly, as a ‘Critically Endangered’ species, proof of breeding is significant.  And although breeding is likely to have occurred, this would be the first confirmed breeding at this site since 2012.  I therefore welcome comments from any ‘aythya‘ experts who might be able to confirm that this is indeed a juvenile BAER’S.

A few volunteers from the Beijing Birdwatching Society have been making occasional visits to this site this spring and summer to survey the BAER’S POCHARDS and so, together, we are slowly building up a picture of the status of this very rare duck.  We still lack some basic information such as when they arrive in spring and when they leave in autumn.  Given the site freezes over in winter, it’s very likely they move on but there is at least one photo of a BAER’S POCHARD from this site in January, so it’s possible that some remain if there are open patches of water.

The site is becoming an increasingly popular tourist destination.  With vast lotus pools and shallow water at the northern end, it’s attracting swimmers, fishermen and general tourists who like to pick and take home a lotus flower or two.  And, although it has status as a Provincial Level Nature Reserve, there are apparently plans for ‘development’.  Several sets of plans have been drawn up, including proposals for a “water sports” centre, hovercrafts and an artificial ‘beach’.  Thankfully, for the time being, none of these proposals have been given the go-ahead.  However, the fact that the management is apparently resisting a proposal for the site to be added to the list of important wetlands (which would mean tighter restrictions on development) is a sign that commercial development of this site is clearly a possibility.   Gathering data on the importance of this site for BAER’S POCHARD and other birds and wildlife will be critical in order to make the best case possible against commercial development, or at least to persuade the authorities to retain the most important part of the site as a properly-managed nature reserve.  Watch this space.

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About Terry Townshend

I am a British birder living and birding in Beijing from August 2010 until 2015. Through this blog I hope I can convey a sense of what it is like to live in this thriving, confident and contrasting city and the birdlife that can be found in its environs. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoy writing it! Terry Townshend, Beijing September 2010
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2 Responses to Juvenile BAER’S POCHARD?

  1. Keep up the good work Terry. Sorry to hear you’re leaving next year, I intend returning next year to follow in others’ footsteps in Yunnan to look for Gould’s Shortwing etc – have you been or if not any plans to do so? Jon

  2. Hi Jon. Rumours of me leaving next year may be premature. No certain plans as yet and I may stay, at least for another year or two. Top of my list of places to visit are Xinjiang (again) and Qinghai. Yunnan may have to wait… Good luck if you go!

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