Possible hybrid Baer’s Pochard x Ferruginous Duck

One of the threats to the BAER’S POCHARD (青头潜鸭) is hybridisation with the closely related, and range expanding, FERRUGINOUS DUCK (白眼潜鸭).  At the Baer’s Pochard breeding site in Hebei Province, Ferruginous Duck is a common breeder; I counted more than 60 on site last weekend versus 24 Baer’s.

Another drake, superficially resembling a drake Baer’s, sported a chestnut cap and slightly less white on the flanks than one would expect for a pure Baer’s.  It was associating with a group of Ferruginous Ducks and I recorded the video clip below.  The chestnut cap is particularly noticeable towards the end of the clip.

I hope to visit the site a few more times over the coming weeks and will look out for more evidence of hybridisation and, hopefully, evidence of breeding Baer’s too.

EDIT: It has been suggested by folks at WWT, who have been catching and taking DNA samples from captive birds, that the drake in the video clip may be a first summer male.  Personally, the colour of the cap, resembling the chestnut brown of Ferruginous and not the darker brown typical of Baer’s, makes me think there is some Ferruginous influence but I’ll go back soon and try to get more photos!

 

 

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About Terry Townshend

I am a British birder living and birding in Beijing from August 2010 until 2015. Through this blog I hope I can convey a sense of what it is like to live in this thriving, confident and contrasting city and the birdlife that can be found in its environs. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoy writing it! Terry Townshend, Beijing September 2010
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2 Responses to Possible hybrid Baer’s Pochard x Ferruginous Duck

  1. Max Berlijn says:

    Since the early zero’s I am trying to get attention for the dramatic decline of Bear’s Pochard. For years I got answers that I was over exaccurating, mainly by Birdlife. Even in the mid zero’s they (Birdlife) claimed thousands of birds beiing shot by hunters (?!) .. Now that they finally realize the bird is really in severe trouble it seems they still tring to find excuses (like first year males with brown on the heads…) to minimize the problem. Thats one of the reasons I am not impressed by Birdlife and there work. The same is happening to the rare White-faced Plover, surrely in trouble, but they do not take action to rescue there breeding grounds because there is not enough prove for Birdlife that it is a species yet…..

  2. Max Berlijn says:

    Sorry I forgot to say, keep up the good work Terry!

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