Relict Gull

RELICT GULL (Larus relictus, 遗鸥) is a relatively poorly known species.  Until the early 1970s it was thought to be a race of Mediterranean Gull and some even thought it a hybrid between Mediterranean Gull x Common Gull….

It breeds inland at colonies in Kazakhstan, Mongolia and China and winters almost exclusively on the mudflats of the Bohai Bay in eastern China.  It is classified as “Vulnerable” by BirdLife International, partly because of its susceptibility to changes in climate but also because almost the entire population is reliant on the tidal mudflats of the Bohai Bay in winter, a habitat that is rapidly diminishing as land reclamation intensifies – threatening not just Relict Gull but a host of East Asian flyway species, including of course the Spoon-billed Sandpiper.

Relict Gull is a bird I am always pleased to see and, occasionally, in late March and early April, these birds can be seen in Beijing – for example at Wild Duck Lake or Miyun Reservoir – as they begin their migration to the breeding grounds.  Autumn records in the capital are much scarcer which made Saturday’s sighting of an adult at Yeyahu NR with visiting Professor Steven Marsh all the more pleasing.  However, it is a trip to the Hebei coast, particularly south of Tangshan at Nanpu, that will enable any birder to get to grips with good numbers of Relict Gull at almost any time of the year…  Numbers in winter can be in the 1000s, which makes for quite a spectacle, but even in summer a few immature birds and non-breeders remain.  There is still much to learn about this gull, including its distribution – in 2012 Paul Holt discovered a wintering population of over 1,000 near Zuanghe in Liaoning Province (see image below).

Last week, in the company of Per Alstrom and Lei Ming, I visited the coast at Nanpu and we were treated to more than 100, most probably recent arrivals from the breeding grounds, patrolling the mudflats amongst the local shellfish pickers..  They feed on the local crabs, a delicacy that seems to be in plentiful supply!  Below are some images of moulting adults, second calendar year and first year birds.

Local shellfish collectors

Local shellfish collectors

Relict Gulls, near Zuanghe, Liaoning Province, January 2012 (image by Paul Holt).

Relict Gulls, near Zuanghe, Liaoning Province, January 2012 (image by Paul Holt).

Adult and 2cy RELICT GULLS, Nanpu Hebei Province, August 2013

Adult RELICT GULL, Nanpu, Hebei Province, August 2013

Adult RELICT GULL, Nanpu, Hebei Province, August 2013

2cy RELICT GULL, Nanpu, Hebei Province, August 2013

2cy RELICT GULL, Nanpu, Hebei Province, August 2013

Relict Gull (first calendar year).  Note, in particular, the dark centres to the tertials, darkish legs and bill.

Relict Gull (first calendar year). Note, in particular, the dark centres to the tertials, darkish legs and bill.

Relict Gull (first calendar year) in flight.

Relict Gull (first calendar year) in flight.

 

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About Terry Townshend

I am a British birder living and birding in Beijing from August 2010 until 2015. Through this blog I hope I can convey a sense of what it is like to live in this thriving, confident and contrasting city and the birdlife that can be found in its environs. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoy writing it! Terry Townshend, Beijing September 2010
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One Response to Relict Gull

  1. John Holmes says:

    Useful to see these photos… we get 1cy and 2cy Relict Gulls sometimes in winter down here in Hong Kong – but anything with red legs or bill would throw me into a spin !

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